Decimal Numbers
      Decimal representation of rational numbers or fractions
      Expanded form of decimal number, decimal fractions
         Whole number part or integer part (integral part) and decimal places
      Terminating decimals
      Recurring decimals (Infinite decimals, period)
         Purely recurring decimals
         Mixed recurring decimals
      Converting decimal number to a fraction
         Converting terminating decimal to a fraction
         Converting the purely recurring decimal to a fraction
         Converting the mixed recurring decimal to a fraction
Decimal representation of rational numbers or fractions
In order to convert a rational number represented as a fraction into decimal form, one may use long division. 
By dividing the numerator by the denominator we get a terminating or a recurring decimal. 
If the final remainder is 0 the quotient is a whole number or a finite or terminating decimal, i.e. a decimal with a limited number of digits after the decimal point.
Examples:
Sometimes when dividing, the division will never stop as there is always a remainder. 
These fractions convert to a recurring, (periodic or infinite) decimals, and they have an unlimited number of digits after the decimal point.
Examples:
A rational number is either a terminating decimal or recurring decimal.
We can determine which fraction will convert to terminating decimal and which to recurring decimal only if the given fraction is expressed in its lowest terms, that is, when its numerator and the denominator have no common factor other than 1.
Expanded form of decimal number, decimal fractions
The integer and fractional parts of a decimal number are separated by a decimal point. 
Converting decimals to fractions involves counting the number of places to the right of the decimal point. 
This will give the corresponding place value, which then determines the number of zeros that will be used in forming the denominator. 
The numerator of the fraction equivalent is the number without the decimal point, and the denominator is 1 followed by the number of zeros corresponding to the number of decimal places.
Example:
 
Terminating decimals
The irreducible fractions, i.e., the vulgar fractions in lowest terms, of which the only prime factors in a denominator are 2 and/or 5, convert to terminating decimals.
That is, the terminating decimals represent rational numbers whose fractions in the lowest terms are of the form a/(2n ∑ 5m).
Examples:  
   
Recurring decimals (Infinite decimals, period)
Purely recurring decimals
The irreducible fractions, i.e., the vulgar fractions in lowest terms whose prime factors in the denominator are other than 2 or 5, that is, the prime numbers from the sequence (3, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, ...) convert to the purely recurring decimals, i.e., the decimals which start their recurring cycle immediately after the decimal point.
Examples:  
Mixed recurring decimals
The irreducible fractions, i.e., the vulgar fractions in lowest terms whose denominator is a product of 2's and/or 5's besides the prime numbers from the sequence (3, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, ...) convert to the mixed recurring decimals, i.e., the decimals that have some extra digits before the repeating sequence of digits.
The repeating sequence may consist of just one digit or of any finite number of digits. The number of digits in the repeating pattern is called the period. All recurring decimals are infinite decimals.
Examples:  
All fractions can be written either as terminating decimals or as recurring/repeating decimals.
Converting decimal number to a fraction
Converting terminating decimal to a fraction
Examples:  
Converting the purely recurring decimal to a fraction
When converting the purely recurring decimal less than one to fraction, write the group of repeating digits to the numerator, and to the denominator of the equivalent fraction write as much 9ís as is the number of digits in the repeating pattern.
Examples:  
Converting the mixed recurring decimal to a fraction
When converting the mixed recurring decimal less than one to fraction, write the difference between the number formed by the entire sequence of digits, including the digits of the recurring part, and the number formed only by the digits of the non-recurring pattern to its numerator.
To the denominator of the equivalent fraction write as much 9ís as is the number of digits in the repeating pattern and add as much 0ís as is the number of digits in the non-recurring pattern.
Examples:  
Beginning Algebra Contents A
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